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Higher Temperatures Could Increase COPD Symptoms

Posted on February 16, 2016 by Disability Help Group

Those diagnosed with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) experience a range of symptoms that can make breathing difficult. But a new study found that higher temperatures (both indoors and outdoors) could worsen symptoms. As a result, it could cause decreased lung function.

Participants in the study included 84 former smokers who had moderate to severe COPD. Daily assessments of symptoms and temperatures (inside and outside) raise concerns about the impact of climate change. Researchers suggest looking at ways to prevent adverse reactions with potential temperature increases. It also indicates a problem for those with the disease who live in particularly warmer climates.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports that about 15 million people in the U.S. have this condition. Lung diseases most often associated with COPD include chronic bronchitis and emphysema. Symptoms can include wheezing, coughing and shortness of breath. But it can also lead to pulmonary heart disease. That’s because the breathing difficulties force the heart to work harder

Unfortunately, it’s a condition that gets progressively worse. Social Security Administration (SSA) includes COPD in its listing of impairments. But to qualify for disability benefits, you need more than a diagnosis. Proof of reduced lung capacity is also required.

Through SSA, a doctor will perform a lung function test. The results must show airflow is significantly limited. There may be other ways to prove eligibility, such as accompanying medical problems or reduced breathing capacity. In the end, proof that the condition prevents you from working is going to be necessary.

To learn more about qualifying for disability benefits when diagnosed with COPD, seek legal counsel. a representative can explain some of the different ways of proving eligibility. Contact Disability Help Group to learn more about your rights. Call us at 1-(800)-800-3332 or contact us online.