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New Medication in Pill Form Eases Asthma Symptoms

Posted on August 10, 2016 by Disability Help Group

Asthma is a chronic condition affecting 39.5 million people in the United States alone, according to statistics from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). About 10.5 million of those suffering are children. While there is no cure, different treatments are available.

Asthma treatments in the past focused mainly on inhalant medications to reduce airway inflammation and triggers.

However, research funded by Novartis Pharmaceuticals, the United Kingdom National Institute for Health Research, and the European Union Airway Disease Predicting Outcomes through Patient Specific Computational Modelling (AirPROM) program shows promise for the first new asthma pill in 20 years.

The Fevipiprant pill is a twice-daily oral pill treatment for asthma symptoms. In the study, published in The Lancet Respiratory Medicine journal, researchers divided 61 people into two groups, one receiving the medication and the other a placebo.

Members in the group that took Fevipiprant reduced their sputum eosinophil count (a measurement of the severity of asthma) from a pre-treatment average of 5.4 percent to about 1.1 percent after 12 weeks of treatment. (To put this in perspective, a non-asthmatic would likely have a reading of less than one percent.)

While some current treatments like rescue inhalers treat some critical symptoms, Fevipiprant treated all symptoms and caused an improvement on all diagnostic tests. Researchers believe the new pill could be used to stop preventable asthma attacks and provide a better daily quality of life.

Chronic, Severe Asthma Can Qualify for Social Security Disability Benefits

When attacks and symptoms make it impossible for you to work and function on a daily basis, you might qualify for Social Security disability benefits.

To find out if you might qualify, contact the Disability Help Group at 800-800-2009 to schedule a consultation with one of our disability advocates.